Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Welcome to www.uolog.net

Health Care Quality Gaps and Disparities Persist in Every State

States are seeing improvements in health care quality, but disparities for their minority and low-income residents persist, according to the 2010 State Snapshots, released today by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

New Hampshire, Minnesota, Maine, Massachusetts and Rhode Island showed the greatest overall performance improvement in 2010. The five states with the smallest overall performance improvement were Kentucky, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. As in previous years, AHRQ's 2010 State Snapshots show that no state does well or poorly on all quality measures.

Among minority and low-income Americans, the level of health care quality and access to services remained unfavorable. The size of disparities related to race and income varied widely across the states.

"Every American should have access to high-quality, appropriate and safe health care, and we need to increase our efforts to achieve that goal because our slow progress is not acceptable," said AHRQ Director Carolyn M. Clancy, M.D. "These AHRQ 2010 State Snapshots not only provide states with a benchmark on how they are doing in these areas, but they also provide resources that states can use to make improvements."

The 2010 State Snapshots, an interactive Web-based tool, show whether a state has improved or worsened on specific health care quality measures. For each state and the District of Columbia, this tool features an individual performance summary of more than 100 measures, such as preventing pressure sores, screening for diabetes-related foot problems and giving recommended care to pneumonia patients. It also compares each state to others in its region and the Nation.

Easy-to-read data charts indicate current strengths, weaknesses and opportunities for improvement for each state. Health leaders, insurers, providers, researchers and consumers can use the State Snapshots data to examine the extent of health care quality and disparities in their states and take steps to address gaps in quality care and access to services.

The 2010 State Snapshots summarize health care data by:

A new feature this year is a State Resource Directory that provides tools and information on assessing quality measures and disparities data that states can use to develop their own health care quality and disparities measures. Also available are direct links to AHRQ's Health Care Innovations Exchange, a searchable database in which users can find information and resources on evidence-based innovations that others in their states have used to improve care.

Other highlights include special focus areas on diabetes, asthma, clinical preventive services, disparities, health coverage status and variations over time.

The 2010 State Snapshots are based on data from the 2010 National Healthcare Quality Report and National Healthcare Disparities Report, which are mandated by Congress and produced annually by AHRQ. Data are drawn from more than 30 sources, including government surveys, health care facilities and health care organizations.

Medical education

Medical education is education related to the practice of being a medical practitioner; either the initial training to become a physician (i.e., medical school and internship), or additional training thereafter (e.g., residency, fellowship and continuing medical education).
Medical education and training varies considerably across the world. Various teaching methodologies have been utilised in medical education, which is an active area of educational research.
In most countries, continuing medical education (CME) courses are required for continued licensing. CME requirements vary by state and by country. In the USA, accreditation is overseen by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME). Physicians often attend dedicated lectures, grand rounds, conferences, and performance improvement activities in order to fulfill their requirements. Additionally, physicians are increasingly opting to pursue further graduate-level training in the formal study of medical education as a pathway for continuing professional development.
Medical education is increasingly utilizing online teaching, usually within learning management systems (LMSs) or virtual learning environments (VLEs). Additionally, several medical schools have incorporated the use of blended learning combining the use of video and in-person exercises. A landmark scoping review published in 2018 demonstrated that online teaching modalities are becoming increasingly prevalent in medical education, with associated high student satisfaction and improvement on knowledge tests. However, the use of evidence-based multimedia design principles in the development of online lectures was seldom reported, despite their known effectiveness in medical student contexts.
Research areas into online medical education include practical applications, including simulated patients and virtual medical records. When compared to no intervention, simulation in medical education training is associated with positive effects on knowledge, skills, and behaviors and moderate effects for patient outcomes.
At present, in the United Kingdom, a typical medicine course at university is 5 years or 4 years if the student already holds a degree. Among some institutions and for some students, it may be 6 years (including the selection of an intercalated BSc+taking one year+at some point after the pre-clinical studies). All programs culminate in the Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery degree (abbreviated MBChB, MBBS, MBBCh, BM, etc.). This is followed by 2 clinical foundation years afterward, namely F1 and F2, similar to internship training. Students register with the UK General Medical Council at the end of F1. At the end of F2, they may pursue further years of study. The system in Australia is very similar, with registration by the Australian Medical Council (AMC).
In the US and Canada, a potential medical student must first complete an undergraduate degree in any subject before applying to a graduate medical school to pursue an (M.D. or D.O.) program. U.S. medical schools are almost all four-year programs. Some students opt for the research-focused M.D./Ph.D. dual degree program, which is usually completed in 710 years. There are certain courses that are pre-requisite for being accepted to medical school, such as general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, mathematics, biology, English, labwork, etc. The specific requirements vary by school.
In Australia, there are two pathways to a medical degree. Students can choose to take a five- or six-year undergraduate medical degree Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS or BMed) as a first tertiary degree directly after secondary school graduation, or first complete a bachelor's degree (in general three years, usually in the medical sciences) and then apply for a four-year graduate entry Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) program.

 


http://www.mainpokercapsa.com/main-judi-bola-online . indo7poker.com . jtfoxxfraud.com . cryotherapy . casino malaysia . bandartogel4d . judi bola . Kamagra Wirkung . prideofmaui.com . daftar sbobet . instagram like bot . kkkim.com . mm5593.com . hasil togel hkg . https://myeconomyreview.com/it-works-reviews/
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality 540 Gaither Road Rockville. Data Sources for the At-Risk Community-Dwelling Patient Population